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The Magpie Sings the Great Depression:
Selections from DeWitt Clinton High School's Literary Magazine, 1929-1942

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Lament

By Robert S. Warshow, '33

The Magpie, June 1932, v. 33, n. 2, p. 12.

I came and told them of my dreams,
Told them of the glories
That were to be . . .
Unveiled the hidden corners of my heart.
But they laughed at me,
They did not understand.
They laughed at me,
And sent me forth to play.
(For I was but a child,
And they were old,
And very wise.)

I showed them that
Which seemed so plain to me.
But they were blind,
And did not see.
They couldn't see . . .
For they were old and wise,
And dreams meant naught to them.

I came and told them of my dreams,
Told them of the wonders that I dreamt,
All my hopes

All my secret imaginings—
That were so dear to me.
But they laughed at all my dreams,
Took my secret soul,
And held it up to ridicule,
And turned aside
And sent me out to play.
(For I was but a child,
And they were old,
And dreams meant naught to them.)

And so I left,
And dreamed alone,
And kept my thoughts
Within the prison of my mind,
And held my peace.

But still they laugh
To see me as I sit alone,
And when I dare to speak
They mock at me,
And bid me go to play.
(For I am but a child,
And they are old,
And cannot see the light of day.)




The Magpie Sings the Great Depression

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